Deck Building – Numbers

One of the age-old questions in card games is how many of a card or cards to use in a deck. For this article, we’ll take a look at this question, and look at some guidelines for how to approach numbers in a given deck.

How many copies of a card should be in a deck?

In card games such as Magic: the Gathering, a 4-of represents a card that someone wants to draw at least 1 of in a game, preferably in multiples. However, the concept of “level” from WS is not necessarily analogous to the concept of “mana” or “lands” in Magic. If someone is playing a land every turn in a game of Magic, it’s generally favorable. If someone is going up a level every turn in a game of WS, it’s generally seen as hideously unfavorable. In addition, WS does not have a “deck-out” rule that causes a player to lose, and the deck size is 50, not 40 or 60. With this in mind, the rule of how many copies of a card in a deck has to be tuned relatively to its level.

(The number refers to the number of copies, followed by an approach and reasoning for that number)

At level 0 – 1

4: I want to use this card as many times as possible, and I am okay with sending this card to the clock early if necessary.

3: I want to use this card, around one or two in a given game. I might occasionally send this card to clock.

2: I want to see this card sometimes, maybe once or twice in roughly half of the games I play. It is beneficial, but not critical to my game plan. If I draw it in a spot where it isn’t good, I can send it to clock. Otherwise, I can hold onto it for its effect.

1: I want to see this card rarely, maybe once in a little less than half of the games I play. It is beneficial, but usually narrow. Because I know it’s the only copy in my deck, I will rarely clock it unless it’s absolutely the worst card I could have drawn.

At level 2

4: I want to see this card as many times as possible, especially at level 2. Because it’s very likely that I’ll be drawing another before level 2, I can afford to mulligan this if I draw one in the opening hand, or send it to clock. I could also be using 4 because I want to Change into this card.

3: I want to use this card once or twice in a given game. I can afford to clock a copy of it if I already have one in hand, but I will only occasionally mulligan this card. I will mulligan this card if I want to Change into it however.

2: I want to see this card about once in roughly half of my games, but I will rarely clock this card if I should draw it. This card is good, but only occasionally good in multiples. I would rather search for or salvage this card if given the option.

1: I want to use this card about once in a little under half of my games, but I will never clock this card unless I absolutely have to. I’m using this card for a very specific beneficial effect, but it isn’t effective in multiples. I want to be able to search for this card if given the option.

At level 3

3-4: I want to use as many of these as possible in a given game. I would be okay with sending this card to clock from levels 0 to 1 and sometimes during level 2, if I have little damage and if I’ve refreshed with 6+ CXs.

1-2: I want to use this card, but only sometimes, and typically for its effect only. I would rather search for or salvage this card than try to draw it naturally. I’m usually okay with sending this card to the clock unless its effect will be critical to winning.

Wait! What about CXs?

Fortunately, CXs are not nearly as complex.

4-8: I want this to trigger as many times as possible. I am okay with having most to all of the effect on the CX define how much of the deck plays. The CX combos that I use will almost certainly work if I draw them, but I will only be able to use 1 or 2 in the deck.

2-3: I want to trigger this on occasion, and have a greater diversity of effects and triggers in the deck. I might have 2-3 CX combos, and want to be able to use them all with reasonable frequency.

1: I don’t care about any combo that this CX might be a part of, I just want to diversify the types of effects my CX base has.

Questions? Comments? Have an idea for another article? Send us an email at theninthcx AT gmail DOT com! Thanks for reading!